The new good life – what do employees want?

The new good life – what do employees want?

   No matter who we are, where we live and what we do for a living, deep in our core, we all want to live the good life. It's easy to assume t

 

 No matter who we are, where we live and what we do for a living, deep in our core, we all want to live the good life. It’s easy to assume that the good life means dramatically different things to different people, but in fact recent research reveals that most of us have remarkably similar fundamental desires! We caught up with Rupert Poulson, Founder and CEO of Avinity to take a look at how employees can ‘enable the good life’!

 

“According to the recent report, ‘Enabling the Good Life’ from a Sustainable Brand and Harris Poll – May 2017, meaningful human connections, balance and health are the top priorities for the majority of people – young, old, male and female. Golden aspirations of the past, such as financial independence, have been supplanted, and rightly so it would seem. Research suggests that our new good-life priorities will put us on the path to long-term happiness.

 With most of us now spending 60% of their waking hours at work, it’s inevitable that people are increasingly looking to their employer for more than a paycheck

Cultivating these happiness-enhancers isn’t easy though when we’re working harder and longer than ever, using our precious time to earn money rather than pursue the goals most important to us. With most of us now spending 60% of their waking hours at work, it’s inevitable that people are increasingly looking to their employer for more than a paycheck. They’re asking for help to live the life they want.

 

Millennials in particular – who will make up 75% of the workplace within eight years – say that work-life balance, good relationships and wellbeing are among the most important factors to them other than salary when it comes to deciding where to work. They are also taking their personal values into work, judging companies not just on the basis of financial performance but on how they treat their employees.

 

As the call for change gets louder, more and more companies are turning to innovative engagement ideas focused not just on work but also on enhancing employees’ lives overall. Helping employees achieve good, healthy, balanced lifestyles has been convincingly shown to bring a wealth of business benefits, from lower absenteeism to higher productivity[5], yet nowhere near enough employers are making it happen.

 

I found it dispiriting to read in one recent survey that 47% of organisations say employee wellbeing is on senior leaders’ agendas ‘to a little extent or not at all’.

In the same report, 46% admitted that operational demands take precedence over employee wellbeing considerations. One US survey highlights that only 33% of workers under 35 view their employer-employee relationship as a ‘committed partnership’ characterised by trust and care for the individual.

 In one recent survey that 47% of organisations say employee wellbeing is on senior leaders’ agendas ‘to a little extent or not at all

Everyone deserves to live the good life. And today, with our clearer understanding of the common core elements of contentment and what it takes to make humans happy day in, day out, it’s never been easier for employers to step up and play a part in helping their employees live the best possible life.”

 

 

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